CCGaDay Day 11: Weirdest CCG owned

Warning: while I'm going to keep the images SFW, due to the topic it's entirely likely that some of the links will lead you to NSFW places. You should probably wait read this entry until you're home. Unless you're a young teen, in which case you should find a wi-fi hotspot away from prying parents - I remember how it is.

Article after the break...

There's only one real answer for "weirdest" CCG in my book - XXXenophile CCG, which is a study in opposites. It's a collectable game that has no division by rarity. It has astoundingly simple gameplay (designed by James Ernest of Cheapass Games, one of my favorite designers) that is perfect for playing with kids, combined with the property of an erotic comic (of the same name) drawn by Phil Foglio. Years later, they would effectively re-release the game (replacing the artwork with Girl Genius) as Girl Genius: The Works. Mechanically, the games are identical. (And XXXenophile is damned near impossible to find these days, so you'll have better luck buying The Works. Seriously - like original Netrunner packs impossible.)

The gameplay is pretty simple - cards are arranged in a grid. Each side of the card has a row of symbols. On your turn, you rotate a card 180 degrees. If, after rotating, two cards have the same symbol along the edge, the one with more of that symbol "pops" (insert snicker here), and you pick up the card, score the points on it, and follow the game text. (I believe you also gained ownership of that card ante-style, which is less of an issue when there's no such thing as a rare card. But I've only played it single-deck.)

Thinking on it, GG:TW is probably the better implementation of the game. IT's a box set (so no rarities to worry about). The property is aimed to an audience more in line with the difficulty of the game. But the original is such a wonderful contradiction and subversion, that it has to be the weirdest CCG in my collection.

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